Saturday, October 26, 2013

Quebec's Charter of Values

Hello everyone!  A very warm welcome to you all!  The video I have chosen for this post is a 2 minute clip on Quebec's Charter of Values.

I have been wanting to discuss this topic for a while now ever since this topic cropped up, over a month ago.  I live in Montreal, Quebec, and this Quebec's Charter of Values is spreading like wildfire.  Since many of my fellow bloggers and readers are from different parts of the world, it would be interesting to hear what you think of this Quebec Charter of Values.  I posted the video clip in order to inform you all of what it is about so that you will be somewhat informed and feel perhaps more in a position to give your feedback.  

As well, I am wondering if there are charters such as this in other parts of the world and, if so, how it has been working.

Thanks so much to those of you who have wished me a "Happy Birthday".  By this time it will actually be October 27th, my birthday for many of my readers, for others, like myself, it will be in several hours.  :)

Thank you all so much for visiting me here.  I always appreciate and enjoy reading your kind thoughts, which you are always welcome to share by clicking on the 'comments' link at the end of my post.

24 comments:

  1. Bon anniversaire Linda, bon dimanche

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  2. ✿ ❀ ✿
    Thanks Linda for this video and this post ! I enjoy them.

    Have a nice day !!!!
    ✿ ❀ ✿

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  3. I think everyone should be allowed to wear any religious thing they want to.

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  4. It seems ironic to me that they call it a "Charter of Values" and, in it, forbid their employees to express their values. Why wouldn't they just call it what it is...an "anti-religion proclamation"? I guess it's just another sign of the times.

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  5. I believe it will die on the vine. As it should. A neutral standard of values is the essence of an oxymoron.

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  6. Happy Birthday, Linda and have a nice day!
    Greetings, RW & SK

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  7. Happy Birthday to you on this 27th October!
    Wishing you a wonderful day! Greetings, Sandra

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  8. Happy Birthday for 27th, many good wishes, for happiness, sunshine and laughter, and this and more. I wanted to send you some "email" flowers, but didn't have your mail, so they will be on my blog tomorrow for you. Love can travel far and wide, and between friends across the miles, as surely as if we lived next door. I'll read and look at the video after our dinner, now 6.30 p.m. Sunday, the 27th here. LOL, Jean XXX

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  9. To me, this is the beginning of the loss of freedom. To tell someone what they can and cannot wear! I believe one should have the right to wear anything they want, except if it exposes private parts or uses filthy language.

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  10. I know it is late so happy belated birthday.

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  11. It seems bizarre that elected officials will be exempt from this ruling. It reminds me of the line from Animal Farm: 'All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.'
    I hope you have a very Happy Birthday, Linda.

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  12. Difficult, Linda...
    Lie(f)s.

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  13. Is that HER in 35 years?????????
    hahahahaha!

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  14. I don't agree with this. I don't like it when any government tells someone how to express themselves. That goes against freedom itself in my opinion.

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  15. I have heard of this and agree with those that say it's anything but a charter of values...sounds like a charter of discrimination to me. Happy birthday my friend...no charter against that!

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  16. Linda Happy Birthday ! Mine was on the 3rd of this month : )
    Hot topic .. and unbalanced in fairness when they say elected officials can "wear" what they want while other government employees would not be allowed to do so.
    It should be the same right across the board if they are going to do such a thing.
    I am divided .. I see the pros and cons for both sides , so I have to say I am neutral other than it should be the same requirement of all government employees whether elected or not.
    Joy
    Quebec always has to do something different from the rest of Canada ?LOL

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  17. Happy Birthday, Linda!! I hope you have a wonderful day. :-)

    The charter of values sounds like discrimination to me and sounds as if freedom of religion would be pushed aside.

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  18. i hadn't heard about this, but gosh, it sounds like quite a complicated topic, a bit too complex for me to really comment on, but sounds like it'll be interesting to see what happens...

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  19. Interesting video, I see Justin Trudeau there ( Pierre's son), and I believe it should be the same for everyone, why will some officials be exempt? I would be on the side of allowing all headdress to be worn, next will it be sarongs? suits? collar and tie compulsory for all workers? Maybe this is the tip of the iceberg for new rulings. Ditto to Joe's words... Greetings from Jean. p.s. your flowers are on my blog today XXX

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  20. If they mean that they don't want women to wear all enveloping clothing...then say so; not on spurious religious grounds but on the very real grounds of women realising freedom from ideas which objectify them.

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  21. I do not wonder anymore listening to these things... Happy Birthday!

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  22. I doubt that their Charter of Values is really what it says it is. If religious apparel is unassuming and harmless then it should be no problem. The problems arise when the extremists use it, such as a full face veil or military type wear. Ban the extremes, any sane person knows the difference.

    Happy Birthday Linda.

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  23. I like what Linda said about it sounds like an "anti-religion". I agree with another blogger who said it was unfair/unbalanced for elected officials to be able to wear symbols of their religion. As the newsclip said, the persons have the option of finding another job. However, I am more comfortable knowing there is a Christian in office rather than a non-believer.
    We are encountering this more and more in America with banning of Christian symbols. There is concern that certain passages of the Bible will soon be referred to as hate speech.

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  24. Society should be administered in a secular fashion, but everyone should be permitted the right to proclaim their faith nonetheless. Personal freedom does not contradict secularism as an official policy. I think that Turkey is a great example of this philosophy. I am an atheist, but it certainly does not bother me to see a Jew wearing a yarmulke or a Sikh wearing a turban and they certainly should not be prohibited from so doing. As for the comment earlier that certain passages of the Bible may be considered hate speech, without a doubt they are. The Bible was used by many "christians" to justify slavery and they resisted its abolition right to the end.

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